Pedagogy of Transcription

It’s been a slow blogging year for me but not because of a lack of things to write about. This spring one project I’ve been pleased to work on with some fun Historians here at Brock University has been presented at Historians Teaching History, CAUCE-CNIE, and now STLHE. Professors Michael Driedger and Daniel Samson made… Read More »

When the scaffolding shifts under your feet

Scaffolding has been one of my favourite metaphors for teaching and learning since I learnt of Vygotsky during my psychology of child development course in second year undergrad. Today, I briefly opened twitter to see this provocative statement: Scaffolding is "colonial, patriarchal, and disempowering" #moocmooc — Sean Michael Morris (@slamteacher) January 25, 2016 I… Read More »

Diversities in Acting Training

Tales of the Collaborative Journey… With help from a grant from the Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities I was able to dedicate a large portion of my summer working on this super cool project, led by Dr. David Fancy from Brock University’s Dramatic Arts department and logistically managed by my Centre for Pedagogical… Read More »

Spring Perspectives

Yesterday, Tuesday April 28 was the Centre for Pedagogical Innovation’s annual Spring Perspectives teaching & learning day. This year, our former director Dr. Barry Joe is retiring after 35 years at Brock University. In 2013, Barry had launched a new initiative called the Last Lecture, based on a U.S. tradition of having a faculty culminate the… Read More »

Pedagogical Walk and Talk

GNA Garcia, the gentlewoman scholar and one my favourite saunterers, first told me about the Henry David Thoreau’s, Walking essay. In it, Thoreau extolls the virtues of walking as a source of inspiration  and generation of knowledge and reflection. My most recent jaunt through the woods, this past Friday at noon reminded me of this… Read More »

Should faculty provide students with lecture notes?

Stemming from an interesting question last week from a professor looking to control the release of his PowerPoint slides based on attendance to class, and our keyword alerts for “Brock” and “Sakai” yielded this student tweet, I was intrigued to look up any literature on the subject. I hate when the prof doesn't put lecture… Read More »

Wikipedia in the Classroom

This week the library and our teaching centre co-hosted a Wikipedia in the Classroom event. We were pleased to have Jonathan Obar, Wikipedia teaching fellow come and give an overview of the Canadian Education Program. He opened the session with the trippy and beautiful audio experience from Listen to Wikipedia. Jonathan gave a great perspective… Read More »

Death to email

tl;dr I use #slack as a chat room and it’s useful. To be truthful, I don’t really want to kill email. I still quite like it for many purposes. A lot of the time, however, it’s just not the right tool. Twitter and text messages are better for short spurts of communication but they are… Read More »

Big Data Sensemaking

This week for Thought Vectors we are to read Vannevar Bush’s 1945 Atlantic essay As We May Think and choose a nugget. This means to: Take a passage from the reading that grabs you in some way and make that passage as meaningful as possible. creative commons licensed ( BY-ND ) flickr photo shared by frau-Vogel Choosing just one… Read More »

How do I feel when I think?

Wow, what a great question. I’m with Cindy on a lot of points, it’s not an easy question to answer. At first, I wanted to glibly say, “Great! I feel GREAT when I think!” but a my over-riding skeptical side knows that’s just not true. To work it through, I charted out my “logical” thought… Read More »